Büro von OneNeck Phoenix | Glassdoor

OneNeck Phoenix, AZ (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)

Bewertungen für OneNeck Phoenix, AZ (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)

  • „Good place to start, but keep your eye toward the door”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Vielfalt & Inklusion
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Service Engineer in Phoenix, AZ (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Service Engineer in Phoenix, AZ (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)
    Empfiehlt nicht
    Negative Prognose
    Keine Meinung zu Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei OneNeck (Über 3 Jahre)

    Pros

    I learned a lot during my tenure and was able to see and help customers implement technology changes rapidly. Over the course of my career, I saw companies move from dedicated workloads to more cloud based services. OneNeck gave me an ability to see the issues with this change while increasing my skill set.

    This company had a use it or lose it vacation policy that encouraged time off; working remote prior to the pandemic was a novelty, but is now common; and the low cost of health insurance was amazing!

    Kontras

    This is the least diversified company I've ever worked for.

    From the CEO of TDS (parent company) to my direct supervisor there was not a woman nor person of any color represented in my management line. When I look around at OneNeck, there were only two women in management of 300+ employees. This company and its parent organization sorely lacks actual diversity, but they did a great job talking about inclusion! Implementing diversity at the upper most levels is a hard no.

    The lack of diversity continues in the decision making process: come up with a new idea for a product or a better way of doing work... Bureaucracy steps in and ensures it will not see the light of day. In my last two years all of the decisions came from the top down, managers spend all day in meetings, and I never once had a single skip level meeting.

    Having a diverse skill set was not valued in the pay rubric, and there was no way to make a way into management to change the status quo. Pretty much every manager has held his job since the companies united as a single entity, most appear have been in management before the inception of Windows Server 2008.

    The pay is low when comparing it across the industry, while raises and bonuses are not exactly forthcoming. I used my time to build my skill set, then leave to earn a very significant pay raise.

    My bonuses and pay raises seemed be based on how well I got along with my manager from mid-November through March coupled with how well he got along with his manager. Enabling coworkers, increasing customer satisfaction, learning new/ different technology, or assisting sales didn't make a difference in my income.

    Rat an das Management

    I would diversify the upper management levels of TDS and OneNeck, this would hopefully begin an alignment to lower levels of the organization. More diversity and actively reducing the domineering personality types would allow for new ideas to prosper.

    No longer accept the status quo: managers should reduce the number of meetings they participate in, teams should actively work with other cross functional teams, and individual contributions and knowledge needs to be rewarded.

    Work to align DBAs, Windows, Virtualizaton, Sales, PSEs, etc. Each team should be incentivized toward growing revenue, reducing costs and increasing the customers' satisfaction scores. If sales can't sell and/or costs aren't reduced, it is everyone's problem.

    Finally, take a look at how many people actually read the TPS Reports... There are a lot of procedures and methods that exist out of tradition that one team uses to impede another team from getting actual work done. For example: change freezes during the holidays don't stop problems from appearing, they just create additional management approval steps that I had to plead, beg, and jump through. In each use case, every change was always approved and justified. So what's the point of emailing out a company wide change freeze (thaw in the OneNeck parlance)? Doesn't this just simply shift problems around without actual solutions?

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Jobs bei OneNeck, Phoenix, AZ (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)

Gehälter für OneNeck Phoenix, AZ (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)

Gehälter in $ (USD)
Durchschn.
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Etwa 49 Tsd $–75 Tsd $
49 Tsd $
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Etwa 49 Tsd $–75 Tsd $
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75 Tsd $
Etwa 103 Tsd $–134 Tsd $
103 Tsd $
134 Tsd $
Etwa 103 Tsd $–134 Tsd $
103 Tsd $
134 Tsd $
1 Mitarbeitergehalt oder Schätzwert
Etwa 87 Tsd $–103 Tsd $
87 Tsd $
103 Tsd $
Etwa 87 Tsd $–103 Tsd $
87 Tsd $
103 Tsd $

Vorstellungsgespräche bei OneNeck Phoenix, AZ (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)

Erfahrung

Erfahrung
0%
0%
100%

Einladung zum Vorstellungsgespräch

Einladung zum Vorstellungsgespräch
100%

Schwierigkeit

3,0
Durchschnittl.

Schwierigkeit

Schwer
Durchschnittl.
Leicht
  1.  

    Operations Manager - Windows-Vorstellungsgespräch

    Anonymer Bewerber im Vorstellungsgespräch in Phoenix, AZ (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)
    Kein Angebot
    Negative Erfahrung
    Durchschnittl. Gespräch

    Bewerbung

    Ich habe mich online beworben. Der Vorgang dauerte 5 Wochen. Vorstellungsgespräch absolviert im Juli 2014 bei OneNeck (Phoenix, AZ (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)).

    Vorstellungsgespräch

    I interviewed in July/August 2014 for Operations Manager - Windows position. This is a management role for a team of 15-20 engineers including 2 managing supervisors. I went through three rounds of interview. First round was with internal HR. They ran through a list of pre-defined questions. Typical scenario questions about my management style. "How do you handle employees that are not meeting expectations. or How do you handle an angry customer?". I went through to the second round of interview, in person, with the Hiring Manager. I was told I am one of 4 candidates considered for this position. I was asked similar questions. Typical management style questions to show how I can deal with my subordinates, customers and the entire operations process. I did well on the second round and come back for my 3rd interview, also in person. This time I met with other members of the team. I went through a series of technical questions. Mostly Windows related. I did well on technical part. Then proceeded with similar management style questions. It was down to myself and one other candidate for this position. I left the 3rd round feeling very confident. This was on a Thursday. I was told that a decision would be made the following Monday. The following week came and went and further information. I called HR for status update and was told everything was on hold due to internal changes. This came as a surprise. Why drag me and the hiring staff through multiple rounds of interview only to put everything on hold a couple of days later? I waited for 2 weeks with no reply until a call came back on Friday Aug. 5th. I was told that The Operations Manager role was to be relisted but at a reduced rate or $30K less than was previously offered. Obviously a poor excuse, considering that half of the reporting staff is already making more than the offered rate for this management position.

    It's evident that neither myself nor the other candidate were selected for this role. Perhaps the hiring manager felt none of the previous candidates were qualified. I can understand that, but why keep us suspended and lie in the end? Just be honest and explain what it was that we lacked in my qualifications so that I may improve elsewhere. I would love to have some closure on this.

    It's apparent that based on previous reviews, this company is going downhill. They keep losing faith from their existing staff, and clearly this is evident in their interview process and they wasted my time for 5 weeks. I could have used that time for effectively to secure another position.

    Fragen im Vorstellungsgespräch

    • I was asked by the hiring manager to provide an example when I had to break the rules at work.   1 Antwort
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