Arbeitgeberbewertungen für Spotify | Glassdoor.de

Bewertungen für Spotify

Aktualisiert am 18. Februar 2019
325 Bewertungen

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231 Bewertungen

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  1. „Guter Arbeitgeber mit spannendem Produkt”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Befürwortet Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Spotify

    Pros

    Spannendes und dynamisches Unternehmen, viele social Benefits

    Kontras

    Entwicklungsmöglichkeiten und teilweise unklare Managemententscheidungen


  2. Hilfreich (1)

    „Great company to work for”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Director of Sales in Berlin
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Director of Sales in Berlin
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Befürwortet Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Spotify (Über 8 Jahre)

    Pros

    One of the few B2C European unicorns.
    Could not think of the more exciting and glamorous companies to be part of: disrupt music consumption & reinvent music, advertising & much more

    Kontras

    Limited career paths if you are based in the local office, which is normal and probably apply to other companies as well

    Rat an das Management

    Keep up this great & respectful environment

  3. Hilfreich (2)

    „Great professional atmosphere”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Strategic Partnerships in Berlin
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Strategic Partnerships in Berlin
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Befürwortet Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Spotify (mehr als ein Jahr)

    Pros

    Great employer benefits
    Focus on teamwork
    Individual development focus

    Kontras

    Strict schedules and deadlines which can be challenging though improving!

    Rat an das Management

    Increase intake of interns. They're a great addition.


  4. „Great place to work”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Keine Meinung zu Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Spotify

    Pros

    Spotify is a very advanced workplace, eg they have parental leave for both moms and dads, a yearly Hack Week where everyone gets to work on a visionary project and so on.

    Kontras

    Not a lot of holidays and sometimes lack in transparency - startup culture is slowly disappearing.

    Rat an das Management

    Decision making is difficult and takes to long - more authority for employees would be appreciated.


  5. „Great company”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Anonymer Mitarbeiter
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Befürwortet Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Spotify

    Pros

    Fun company in an exciting industry

    Kontras

    None I can think of

    Rat an das Management

    None


  6. „Sounds sexier than it is”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Senior Engineer in Stockholm, Stockholm (Schweden)
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Senior Engineer in Stockholm, Stockholm (Schweden)
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Keine Meinung zu Geschäftsführer

    Ich habe in Vollzeit bei Spotify gearbeitet (Über 3 Jahre)

    Pros

    Spotify has a solid engineering culture. With roughly 1,000 engineers around the globe (though mostly in Stockholm and NYC) there is a lot of internal tooling, which is sometimes hard to debug: the documentation is not always great and there is no help outside of the company. However, the overwhelming majority of the engineers are extremely helpful and spend their time generously helping you debug issues with the internal infrastructure, although the situation has improved as the tooling has matured.

    There are several standardized guides for different disciplines: mobile development, back-end engineering, data engineering, data science, and a few others. These are especially good for newcomers as these allow you to get up and running within a few hours.

    Hack days (2 per month) and an R&D-wide hack week (5 day per annum) are great. These days allow you work on whatever project you wish, so it's great for learning new programming languages, reading up on research, trying out a new framework, or even work on crazy ideas. Annual hack weeks are a major event where all of R&D spends a whole week working on non-work things. There are daily breakfasts, fikas (Swedish cake time), and various events in the office, including a party on Friday to conclude and celebrate hack week.

    Conference week is another annual event, where different "chapters" (disciplines) hold their internal (un-)conferences. This means most of R&D flies across the globe for a week of showing off what's new in the infrastructure and what tools are available or being developed. There are also annual off-sites, where an entire "tribe" (department) comes together at a non-office location. Most of these off-sites tend to be about socializing as there are often about 100 people or so. Most employees seem to enjoy networking with beers at a fancy location, while a few see it for what it is: a colossal waste of time, especially personal time: you have to travel several hours back and forth to spend 24 hours a day with your peers for no other reason than to listen to a few strategy talks, unconference sessions (i.e. discussions that do not need to have any clear outcomes), and eating/drinking. After about two days, the event is over. If you like trips, these are all great. If you prefer to stick to business and keep travel to a minimum because of other commitments or interests, not so much.

    It's great that every employee can choose the laptop they want and you get a fancy desk that can be moved up and down for standing up or sitting down. Any gear you need to be productive or comfortable is usually a simple request from your boss and a click away. It's a no-fuss attitude to whatever people need for their work. Please note that the office areas are not exactly quiet or private, especially in the larger offices. The idea is that an open office plan fosters collaboration, but it's really because it's cheaper and the company is growing like mad.

    Intro days are a three-day event where hundreds of newcomers flock to Stockholm to listen to talks from the CXOs and VPs about the company. It is a great way to introduce people to the company. The same goes for town halls, where the entire company is invited to listen on the latest updates from the executives.

    Most offices are fairly easy when it comes to working from home. In most cases you inform your team about it and that's it. As long as the work gets done and you don't work from home every day of the week, it's all right. You're free to come and go as you please as you don't have to clock in/out.

    In many offices there is sometimes music playing in all areas, not just the reception or central bits. While this is great in theory, it's not always conducive to quality work, especially when people play "Pink Fluffy Unicorns Dancing on Rainbows" or a sequence of 8-bit versions of 80s power ballads. Headphones are definitely a must on those days. Again, when you join you get a pair of headphones, so you're at least covered there.

    Kontras

    If you are not in the main offices (Stockholm or New York) many benefits are not available to you or only after extensive begging. It took several years for Swedish to be offered to foreign employees in the Gothenburg office and even then it was only through a conference call, not on site. Many discounts or special deals (e.g. with banks) are also only available in shops around the major offices, which means employees in the other offices are often left out.

    The time between the official announcement of a promotion and the time when it's registered in the HR system can take up to four months, during which of course the question of a potential salary bump is neatly avoided. I have yet to receive a good explanation why it takes so long or why the company is loath to discuss salary increases for people it deems worthy of promotions.

    The stock options are laughable. Permanent employees do not get many when they join and stock options are granted for exceptional performance, not RSUs, which means you first have to pay for the privilege of getting at the shares. In Sweden you can even pay taxes of up to 90% (e.g. cashless exercise or same-day sale), which means the options are mostly a gift for the government.

    There is somewhat of a frat house culture, which is considered "playful", one of the company's values. This translates into pinball machines, nerf guns, hoverboards, free snacks and drinks, many office parties, ping-pong and billiards tables, Fridays where people walk around in bunny/unicorn/squirrel costumes and drink beer or wine in the afternoon, board games coming out of your ears, Mario Kart competitions, and the likes. The relaxed environment is definitely nice and a big plus. The "playfulness" is for some people a major bonus, while for others it feels silly or yet another way to keep people in the office longer. For those who don't participate, it's an easy way to be excluded and being labelled "not fun".

    Office parties encourage employees to bring along their friends and families. The same goes for sports events. While some love to socialize with colleagues outside of work, that's definitely not for everyone. Again, while it can promote togetherness, it also causes cliques to be formed. The lack of clear boundaries can also be a fast track to burn-out, although most employees are too young to have experienced (or care about it), or they do not mind melding work and their private lives.

    Diversity and inclusion are major threads running through the company. A good initiative that's hampered by the idea that inclusion and equality stop at gender and sexuality, but mostly gender. People with a different personality who differ from the norm are often treated as outcasts, especially if these people do not participate in the many social events (outside of work hours). I doubt that happens on purpose, but it definitely happens. While that's to be expected, there have been occasions in which a manager called out a person (an engineer) for not smiling enough. The reason was that others thought the person was perceived to be intimidating by not having a friendly face. There are also not too many people over the age of 35-40 within the company, especially in engineering roles.

    Email threads with several dozen or even a hundred people who all hit "Reply All" are very common, especially when congratulating people on promotions or when people join the company. Fortunately, you can mute those conversations when they arrive but they are still annoying as they clog up your inbox. The same is true of mutual appreciation email threads. While it could be said such emails are to keep people informed and "celebrate wins", they usually only show that the group of included people was too large or that the bar for "celebrations" was really low. Hardly a thread goes by without a GIF or meme.

    "Lunch and Learn" sessions are terrible. Yes, the company pays for the lunch, which for some people is the sole reason to show up. But it's also a way to keep on working when you should really be resting your mind. In a sense, it's also insulting to the speaker who cannot eat during the usual lunch hour but has to talk to a group of people who are masticating and listening with half an ear.

    Let's not beat about the bush: middle management is incompetent. Apart from sitting in meetings most of the day, there is not a lot they achieve, if anything. Most employees have half an hour every other week when they talk to their superior in a one-on-one. Those times tend to be eaten up with inane questions about projects the managers have no real idea about but heard mentioned in a meeting by someone else. Furthermore, it's not uncommon these sessions are cancelled on short notice due to managers being too busy or away at another office. I have had three different managers in my time at Spotify and not one of my superiors had a notebook (or laptop) with them for jotting down notes during such a 1:1. If a piece of paper was needed, the room's post-its and Sharpies were used for that. There is hardly ever any follow-up because, well, I guess, they forget where they stuck the post-its after the meeting.

    The same goes for agile coaches. The company has dozens of them in most larger offices. What they do I don't know. They sometimes facilitate a retrospective for a team, but other than that they seem to be evangelists of productivity fads, such as the pomodoro technique.

    Every six months employees need to ask feedback from their coworkers, which as far as I have been able to determine is only because otherwise the managers have no idea of their underlings' achievements or performance. They are not involved in the "squad" (i.e. team) work and there is typically a product manager per team who does the day-to-day prioritization and stakeholder management, although the latter tends to be outsourced to employees too. The feedback is (as is to be expected when asking peers) fuzzy at best. People obviously don't take notes about their coworkers, so it's often a five-minute rehash of what they can remember from the past week or so, watered down by the fact that no one wants to go on record saying their colleague is a complete jerk.

    The feedback is not used as a means to cause changes in behaviour as that's left to the employee to decide whether they want to. While that's good as it leaves the employee in question in charge of their own (professional) development, it's also very loose, leading to no real change whatsoever. It mostly feels like an exercise in futility. You are required to fill in a sheet with accomplishments ahead of time, so that your manager can see what you did. It's also hard to accept the advice of a manager when that same manager hasn't the slightest idea what you did and whether you did it well - nor the means necessary to make such an assessment. Employees who do the work without making a big fuss about it often get short-changed: self-promotion is the way to make sure you're seen as a high performer, whether you actually did the work or not.

    Every year there is a reorganization within R&D, not because there is a specific need that needs to be addressed, but because it's reorg season. In most cases, these reorgs amount to nothing more than relabelling departments and shuffling a handful of people around. In the years I've been at the company I've seen a reorg every single year without having seen any tangible benefits. I understand there is no single organizational structure that solves all problems, but the rationale for reorgs is often lacking or at the very least not entirely clear. Even after several years it's opaque how decisions are made. Data-driven decision-making is a lie.

    One of the key insight is that although Spotify started off as a music streaming company, the actual work has very little to do with music for the overwhelming majority of engineers. Don't be fooled into thinking the company has a flat hierarchy either. From a regular engineer up to the C-suite are 5-6 people in some departments. That's not to say the company is overly focused on processes, although that's starting to increase as it grows (up).

    Rat an das Management

    Lack of support with housing in Sweden is the main gripe. Foreigners that join the company get relocation assistance, so you can find a place to rent for a year or so. That's great! After that you're on your own though. In Stockholm there is limited support with agencies but Gothenburg has no such support, I am told. Considering that the system works based on how many years you've been in the queue and foreigners by definitions start from zero, you're in for 4-6 years of going from place to place every 3-6 months with your stuff in storage. Few people with families are willing to live like that, so they pack their bags again and leave.

    I know the company is not responsible for the housing crisis/racket in Sweden, but having a roof over your head, preferably the same roof for at least a few years, is a basic requirement. In fact, it's the lowest rung of Maslov's hierarchy of needs. Without that, the rest hardly matters.

    Spotify is great to have on your CV, but the lack of housing (and, no, the Swedish stock answer to buy a place of your own is not the solution for everyone!) and the lack of real career advancement means that it's just that: a stepping stone to another job at another company.

    What is more, I suggest the company drastically reduce middle management. Engineering managers who are not involved in the actual team's work and only see their underlings once a fortnight have no business being managers and giving advice based on what they see when they walk past the team area on their way to the toilet or kitchen.

    I left the company not because I wanted to or had a better offer, but because I had to: after four years my family and I grew tired of looking continuously for rentals and moving all the time.


  7. „Good but not the best”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Marketing
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Marketing
    Empfiehlt
    Neutrale Prognose
    Keine Meinung zu Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Spotify

    Pros

    - The industry is AMAZING
    - You have the opportunity to extend massively your network
    - If you decide to leave the company anyone would love to hire you

    Kontras

    - Organization needs to be improved
    - If you are not in a big office (NY, LND, STO) you are basically invisible, also if you bring results
    - Company values only on the PPTs

    Rat an das Management

    Challenge the middle management and create a transparent organization.

  8. Hilfreich (5)

    „Varies a lot team to team”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Senior ML Engineer in New York, NY (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)
    Akt. Mitarbeiter - Senior ML Engineer in New York, NY (Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika)
    Empfiehlt nicht
    Positive Prognose
    Keine Meinung zu Geschäftsführer

    Ich arbeite in Vollzeit bei Spotify (Über 3 Jahre)

    Pros

    Smart coworkers, easy to get a long with. Pay is ok especially for very good work life balance. Total compensation depends on when you joined and how your options are worth, but base salary is good and so are benefits. New NYC office is very confenient and nice. Work can be interesting depends on your team.

    Kontras

    Near constant reorganizations. Very inexperienced management, from middle management to the top. HR is nightmare, but good news is most of the people can just avoid them. No RSUs. Pay not competitive for very senior people so hard to hire them. Some people have not things to do, because there was too aggressive hiring and now too many people work on small problems.

    Rat an das Management

    Hire experienced managers. Give better comp to senior people and RSUs. Consider performance based bonus.


  9. „Normal employer”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Software Engineer in Stockholm, Stockholm (Schweden)
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Software Engineer in Stockholm, Stockholm (Schweden)
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Keine Meinung zu Geschäftsführer

    Ich habe in Vollzeit bei Spotify gearbeitet (mehr als ein Jahr)

    Pros

    The company has a great culture.

    Kontras

    The salary is no competative

    Rat an das Management

    Normalize the salary


  10. „Great company”

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work-Life-Balance
    • Kultur & Werte
    • Karrieremöglichkeiten
    • Vergütung & Zusatzleistungen
    • Führungsebene
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Marketing
    Ehem. Mitarbeiter - Marketing
    Empfiehlt
    Positive Prognose
    Befürwortet Geschäftsführer

    Ich habe in Vollzeit bei Spotify gearbeitet (Über 5 Jahre)

    Pros

    Fast moving company
    People oriented Swedish spirit at the start
    Very young staff
    Nice offices

    Kontras

    Changed a bit over the last years when going public, less freedom for local initiatives